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False Terror Birds by cjr413 False Terror Birds by cjr413
Pictured here are the two species of the genus Psuedophorusracidae, "False Terror Birds". Although they may look like the extinct genus of giant birds Phorusracidae, they are actually derived from the penguins of Antarctica. As time passed and Antarctica became a lush continent, penguins evolved to be able to move overland, resulting in the "False Terror Birds". If you look at the overall body shape, they strike a resemblance to penguins, with a body that is more tall than wide. However, their legs are a lot longer, allowing them to chase down their prey as the ancient Phorusracidae once did. Their arms, however, are quite primative, and they only possess a small elbow, allowing them to bend their arms somewhat. At the time of the Allocene period, these are almost vestigial, but time will tell whether they come into use later on.
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:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013
The concept is very interesting, and the illustration is well executed :) Unfortunatelly it doesn't fit into the project - there's no terrestrial descendants of penguins in the Allocene, and the niches of predators in Antarctica are filled by the descendants of skuas and sheathbills. I can accomodate these concepts as giant predatory owls if you wish.
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:iconcjr413:
cjr413 Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Ok, that is doable. But the whole guise of this was penguins. Owls will work though.
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:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013
I didn't mean to say skuas but owls before, I'm sorry. The terrestrial owls are the main Antarctic predators in the Allocene, ranging from fairly small forms [link] to Phorusrhacus-sized forms. I could remake your concepts as terrestrial owls, I'd just have to modify the head, beak and wings.
What does "Paradieno" stand for, though?
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:iconcjr413:
cjr413 Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
That would be alright. Paradieno means "False Terrible", referring to the fact that they are not truly Phorusrhacids.
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:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013
Perfect, I think it could work.
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:iconleggurm:
Leggurm Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Apart from the T-rex hands I like it.
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:iconfluffyspiderz:
FluffySpiderz Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Doesn't explain why on earth they would 're-evolve useless fingers.
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:iconcjr413:
cjr413 Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
The primitive arms are evolving to become more complex with grasping capability, which is why they're redeveloping fingers.
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:iconfluffyspiderz:
FluffySpiderz Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Re-evolving lost features is not something that happens very often (if at all) in nature though, and new features only develop for a species that gradually needs them more. I hardly think a giant long-legged death-penguin would have any need for hands too small to use in the first place, when its beak could easily do all the work. That's why many bipedal dinosaurs that weren't already growing wings had progressively smaller forelimbs.
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:iconbhut:
bhut Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013
Interesting idea. I like it.
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:iconcjr413:
cjr413 Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks
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:iconbhut:
bhut Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013
You're welcome.
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